Logic Pro X Changing velocity for midi keyboard via Logic Pro X?

MusicainDeum777

New Member
Hey everyone! I've recently graduated from Garageband to Logic Pro X, and I seem to be having trouble configuring my digital keyboard piano (Technics SX-P30). For some reason, I have to hammer the keys in order to get a decent velocity for any virtual instrument in Logic. I really noticed this when I tried using the Celtic Hammered Dulcimer virtual instrument — I can't get a crisp, clear note out of the thing. I used to have another keyboard that worked better in Logic (where the velocity was just fine), but this particular keyboard of mine is being a stubborn pain in the butt.

Is there a way to adjust velocity settings in Logic Pro X so that I don't have to hammer the keys to get decent velocity when I'm playing? I really don't want to go through my tracks by hand turning up the velocity on every note, so getting some kind of configuration set up would be preferable.

Hope that all makes sense!
 

fuzzfilth

Logician
While you could patch in a Transformer (and I can guide you through this) on the Environment page to fix this, be aware that you lose velocity resolution by doing so, as you spread the fixed amount of velocity steps that the keyboard provides over a wider total range. In this respect, it would be much better to adjust the velocity curve on the keyboard if it does have that option.
 
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MusicainDeum777

New Member
While you could patch in a Transformer (and I can guide you through this) on the Environment page to fix this, be aware that you lose velocity resolution by doing so, as you spread the fixed amount of velocity steps that the keyboard provides over a wider total range. In this respect, it would be much better to adjust the velocity curve on the keyboard if it does have that option.
I wish I had a velocity curve adjustment on the keyboard itself, but I don't see one.

When you talk about losing velocity resolution, does that mean that the notes won't be as crisp? I don't want to lose the quality of the sound if I can help it.
 
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fuzzfilth

Logician
No, I'm not talking about the sound, I'm talking about the notes driving the sound. Hypothetical scenario (in reality its quite a bit more complex):

You have a controller which outputs only 0 - 63 in terms of velocity. You stretch that to 0-127 at Logic's input by using a Transformer which multiplies everything by 2. You may cover a greater range by this, but you still have only 64 steps, which are twice as wide now. You can play only values 0, 2, 4, 6, 8..., instead of 0, 1, 2, 3,4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Thus your velocity resolution has halved.
 
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MusicainDeum777

New Member
No, I'm not talking about the sound, I'm talking about the notes driving the sound. Hypothetical scenario (in reality its quite a bit more complex):

You have a controller which outputs only 0 - 63 in terms of velocity. You stretch that to 0-127 at Logic's input by using a Transformer which multiplies everything by 2. You may cover a greater range by this, but you still have only 64 steps, which are twice as wide now. You can play only values 0, 2, 4, 6, 8..., instead of 0, 1, 2, 3,4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Thus your velocity resolution has halved.
Ok...that makes my brain hurt just a bit.

So does this mean that, if I add a transformer, I won't be able to play all 88 keys on my keyboard since the velocity's spread so thin? From what you're saying, the sound quality should be fine, but the notes driving the sound will be limited in some way?
 
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fuzzfilth

Logician
I won't be able to play all 88 keys on my keyboard
No. Velocity measures how hard you hit the key, between very soft and very hard. This was your initial complaint, that your playing range (in terms of velocity) does not match the keyboard's range (in terms of velocity) as it expects you to hit the keys harder than you're willing to do.

I'm saying that yes, you can stretch the small velocity range that you actually play to the wide velocity range the keyboard expects and thus cover the entire range of an instrument between ppp and fff.

However, by stretching you just spread what is there across a wider range, you're not magically creating dynamics that weren't there to begin with. So instead of ppp - pp - p - mp - mf, now you can play ppp - p - mf - f - fff which covers a wider range but cannot access every little dynamics nuance that's in the instrument.
 
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Peter Ostry

Administrator
Staff member
Hey everyone! I've recently graduated from Garageband to Logic Pro X, and I seem to be having trouble configuring my digital keyboard piano (Technics SX-P30). For some reason, I have to hammer the keys in order to get a decent velocity for any virtual instrument in Logic.

You should check your piano first.

Download Snoize MIDI Monitor, install it, open it. This software shows almost any MIDI data to, from and inside your computer. When you play on the keyboard, you see the incoming notes. Look at the lines containing "Note On". There, the very last value in each line is the note-on velocity and tells how hard you hit the key. The value next to it is the note number and tells which key you pressed.

In the example below I played the note C4 four times,
from soft to hard. I got velocity 20, 38, 118 and 127:

image.png



Test #1:
Play some middle key from very soft to very hard and watch the velocity values in MIDI Monitor. According to the SX-P30 manual, your piano should be able to send velocity 1-127. What are the lowest and highest velocity numbers you see in MIDI Monitor?

Test #2:
Set the piano's volume slider to the MIN and MAX positions. You don't get a different velocity range, do you?
 
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MusicainDeum777

New Member
You should check your piano first.

Download Snoize MIDI Monitor, install it, open it. This software shows almost any MIDI data to, from and inside your computer. When you play on the keyboard, you see the incoming notes. Look at the lines containing "Note On". There, the very last value in each line is the note-on velocity and tells how hard you hit the key. The value next to it is the note number and tells which key you pressed.

In the example below I played the note C4 four times,
from soft to hard. I got velocity 20, 38, 118 and 127:

image.png



Test #1:
Play some middle key from very soft to very hard and watch the velocity values in MIDI Monitor. According to the SX-P30 manual, your piano should be able to send velocity 1-127. What are the lowest and highest velocity numbers you see in MIDI Monitor?

Test #2:
Set the piano's volume slider to the MIN and MAX positions. You don't get a different velocity range, do you?

Alright. I checked the velocity using the Snoize MIDI Monitor. Here are the results (they didn't change if the volume was set on MIN or MAX):

The highest velocity I got was 100. But that was when I was really hammering the keys—when I play normally, there’s no way I play the keys that hard. So a more realistic velocity number would be around 96.

The lowest velocity I got was 2.

So definitely not the 1-127 range that the keyboard should be giving me.
 
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Peter Ostry

Administrator
Staff member
Ok, your keyboard does not deliver the full velocity range and we do not know why. But your values are not that bad. I have a stage piano here that goes hardly above velocity 100 for note-on. With normal playing I am around 40-50 and this sounds in virtual instruments.

Please load the Logic instrument "Vintage Clav" and play the first preset ("Classic I") on your piano. If I play with medium force, the channelstrip level is around -20 to -14 dB. Where is your level? (don't forget to reset the level before your test).
 
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