filter on narration track?

Edgold

Logician
The speaker is an actor by profession and has very clear diction. But his ps and ts are overly explosive. What filter might one use for it and are there instructions for its use?

Thanks.
 
Use a single band high pass. Just move the cutoff frequency to where the plosives get cutoff. You can also try playing with the filter sharpness, 48db per octave being pretty steep, and remove everything below about 100 hz.
 

mt100uk

Logician
Personally I'm a fan of the Sony Oxford (sonnox) one, it comes in several versions, the HR version induces quite a bit of latency but this trades off against much better low frequency detection. For actual de-essing the new(ish) metric halo offering is my favourite, but doesn't go anywhere near low enough for plosives.
 

mt100uk

Logician
As to usage, you'll need to set the detection/de-essing band above any rumble and below 3-400 hz with a relatively slow release time to avoid pumping, experiment with the ratio and threshold to get natural sounding results. If the de-esser you use has seperate detection and de-essing bands try setting the detection band tighter and lower to avoid picking up low vowel sounds
 
As we get into a discussion about this all I can wonder is: why? A pop filter while recording should remove this issue, or even a pencil taped across the capsule area of the mic should remove any pop energy.

De-essing is one thing (high frequency energy can get jacked up while EQ'ing), but plosives are a very easy problem to resolve during the recording process, right? Use a pop filter, low pass eq on the mic, etc.
 

Edgold

Logician
Thanks guys,

Duane (the narrator) has decided to rerecord the narration but I will send him these replies and will investigate myself for the future.
 
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