Logic Pro X Mute monitors

bizboz

New Member
I'd love to find a way of doing the following, if possible:

Have two stereo outputs for monitoring live mixed audio.

Stereo pair A outputs to audio interface 1.
Stereo pair B outputs to audio interface 2.

When specific faders go up, stereo pair A cuts... while stereo pair B carries audio as normal.

Is this possible, or am I expecting too much? Happy to use plugins or whatever is necessary.
 

Peter Ostry

Administrator
Staff member
This could be possible in Logic's MIDI environment.
To verify, please describe your wish in more detail:
  1. All 'faders' are Logic volume faders, correct?
  2. How many 'specific' faders must go up to cut output A?
  3. Must all specific faders go up or just one of them?
  4. What means 'going up' – leaving the lowest position, or going above a certain value?
  5. What means 'cutting' output A – jumping down like muting or sliding down?
  6. Who tells output A to go up again?
 
Upvote 0

bizboz

New Member
Thanks Peter - good questions.
  1. All 'faders' are Logic volume faders, correct? Yes, that's correct
  2. How many 'specific' faders must go up to cut output A? One or more of the 'mic' faders (all inputs on aggregated device)
  3. Must all specific faders go up or just one of them? Yes, just one, or more that has been designated as a mic fader
  4. What means 'going up' – leaving the lowest position, or going above a certain value? Leaving the lowest position
  5. What means 'cutting' output A – jumping down like muting or sliding down? Muting
  6. Who tells output A to go up again? When all 'mic' faders are completely down again
As a bit more info - I am trying to replicate a live environment in a radio studio. So if any mic faders are up, the output from the monitor speakers (stereo pair A) is cut to avoid feedback. The actual station output (stereo pair B) continues to play.
 
Upvote 0

Markdvc

Administrator
Staff member
Sounds like a ducker set up to regulate the volume going to Speaker Pair A could be a solution, perhaps triggered per side chain feeding off one of the microphone channels.

kind regards

Mark
 
Upvote 0

Peter Ostry

Administrator
Staff member
As Mark said, you can use the signals in the microphone channels to control the monitor output. For example with a Logic Noise Gate in the output channel. In the screenshot below I routed 4 mic channels to a bus and assigned this bus as sidechain in a Noise Gate. The gate is set to "Ducker" mode. The send levels are high, gate threshold and ducking amount are low, so any signal on any mic channel interrupts the output signal. You will never get feedback because even some line noise is enough to cut the output.

Untitled_10_-_Tracks.png


——————————

If you prefer a switching solution in the MIDI Environment, you need two buttons:
  • An "initialize" button to set the mic channels to a known value.
    Press it before you start working. Alternatively you can move each mic fader once. Otherwise the system does not work, because it does not know the fader values before they send something.
  • A button that detects the fader values of the mic channels.
    With all faders down, the button is at zero and the mute button in the output channel is off. If any fader goes up, the button sends a non-zero event which mutes the output channel.

Here is the cabling:

Untitled_10_-_Environment.png


Logic works internally with events of type "Fader". They can be used for everythihng, their syntax is similar to Control Changes but Fader events cannot be used outside of Logic. Number 7 controls volume faders and number 9 controls mute buttons.

The "initialize" button has an output of type Fader, channel 1, value 7, and a value range of 0 0 (it can only send zero). If you press this button before you start working, all mic faders are set to zero:

Cursor_and_Untitled_10_-_Environment.png


The "mute" button receives Fader 1 7 from all mic channels. It will be at zero as long as all mic faders are down. If one or more of the mic faders go up, the button sends Fader 1 9 and values greater 0, which turns the mute button in the output channel on. When all mic faders are down again, the button goes to zero and switches the channel's mute button off.

Cursor_and_Untitled_10_-_Environment.png


Personally I find the audio signal solution better than the Environment switching.
 
Last edited:
Upvote 0

bizboz

New Member
That's awesome Peter, thank you for that explanation! I'll see if I can get this set up. It came about as I'm hoping to use Logic Pro to do software based mixing for presenting local radio (rather than have a big expensive mixer). I may run into slight complications with latency (when hearing my voice in the headphones), but I'm thinking it should be low enough not to bother me too much...
 
Upvote 0
Top