Logic Pro X Routing for Reamping a Guitar DI, and sending to hardware.

Cowboy4d2

Logician
Hello All,
I’m new to the forum and loving all the information and help available here. I’m just staring to get into reamping my DIs and using some external hardware. My questions concern routing, latency, and printing. Some info has you just set the track output to an out of the interface, and new track armed with input of the cab mic, press record and track in real time. Others say use the I/O plug on an insert and ping latency. But what is the best way to print from the I/O since it’s live, concerning latency. Same thing if I’m sending to a hardware verb, how to print without latency? I’ve seen some info on this forum about soloing the I/O track and bouncing, but wouldn’t that render a stereo file? I want to keep reamped guitars and bass in mono.
 

bayswater

Logician
The question that comes to mind, is why are you re-amping? If you're recording live with the amp mic as a source, why not just plug the guitar into the amp and record it? What's the point of setting up a re-amping signal path? If you're recording dry through a DI, then re-amping so you can try out various settings and fine tune, again just go out through the interface to the amp, and back in from a mic through the interface, arm a track, and hit record. The dry track will play back and the re-amped track will record a few millisecond later You can adjust the timing later by moving the re-amped waveform in the editor to align with the dry track (if there is a reason to align the two tracks, if for some reason the two have to play together).

There's no way to get rid of latency. On a typical re-amp signal path, the signal is going through ADA conversion twice, and that takes time. You can get latency pretty low, but not zero.

If you want to record the dry and re-amped signals at the same time, just record them on two different tracks. You can monitor the original dry signal so it doesn't affect your playing. But if you're an experienced live guitar player, and you set the buffer very low so latency is down to less than 10 ms, the latency you experience listening to the amped signal will be roughly the same as standing 10 feet away from an amp in a live performance.
 
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Cowboy4d2

Logician
The question that comes to mind, is why are you re-amping? If you're recording live with the amp mic as a source, why not just plug the guitar into the amp and record it? What's the point of setting up a re-amping signal path? If you're recording dry through a DI, then re-amping so you can try out various settings and fine tune, again just go out through the interface to the amp, and back in from a mic through the interface, arm a track, and hit record. The dry track will play back and the re-amped track will record a few millisecond later You can adjust the timing later by moving the re-amped waveform in the editor to align with the dry track (if there is a reason to align the two tracks, if for some reason the two have to play together).

There's no way to get rid of latency. On a typical re-amp signal path, the signal is going through ADA conversion twice, and that takes time. You can get latency pretty low, but not zero.

If you want to record the dry and re-amped signals at the same time, just record them on two different tracks. You can monitor the original dry signal so it doesn't affect your playing. But if you're an experienced live guitar player, and you set the buffer very low so latency is down to less than 10 ms, the latency you experience listening to the amped signal will be roughly the same as standing 10 feet away from an amp in a live performance.
The question that comes to mind, is why are you re-amping? If you're recording live with the amp mic as a source, why not just plug the guitar into the amp and record it? What's the point of setting up a re-amping signal path? If you're recording dry through a DI, then re-amping so you can try out various settings and fine tune, again just go out through the interface to the amp, and back in from a mic through the interface, arm a track, and hit record. The dry track will play back and the re-amped track will record a few millisecond later You can adjust the timing later by moving the re-amped waveform in the editor to align with the dry track (if there is a reason to align the two tracks, if for some reason the two have to play together).

There's no way to get rid of latency. On a typical re-amp signal path, the signal is going through ADA conversion twice, and that takes time. You can get latency pretty low, but not zero.

If you want to record the dry and re-amped signals at the same time, just record them on two different tracks. You can monitor the original dry signal so it doesn't affect your playing. But if you're an experienced live guitar player, and you set the buffer very low so latency is down to less than 10 ms, the latency you experience listening to the amped signal will be roughly the same as standing 10 feet away from an amp in a live performance.
Thanks for the response!! The reason as to “why I’d be reamping” is simple. When you track through a DI and ampsim, the audio file is extremely easy to edit. The pick attack and initial transient are easy to identify, making clean up and slip editing super accurate. Then turn the amp sim off and reamp the DI with the performance already lock in. But in this case, I’m actually helping out a friend who tracks in the box. He Dropbox transfers his DIs and I give him real amp sounds. Thanks for all the info!!! Extremely helpful. I just want to do it the most efficient way.
 
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bayswater

Logician
Radial Engineering makes some boxes specifically for re-amping. Their main focus is getting the various hardware components to play nicely together, get the impedance match and levels right, etc. But they have some articles on re-amping that might help. Here's one of them:

 
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Cowboy4d2

Logician
Radial Engineering makes some boxes specifically for re-amping. Their main focus is getting the various hardware components to play nicely together, get the impedance match and levels right, etc. But they have some articles on re-amping that might help. Here's one of them:

I’m actually using the Radial ProRmp! I love it. Amp hits a two notes reactive load box. With the right IRs it all sounds good to my ears. Just curious about the logic routing. I’ve been reamping successfully, but have seen several ways described on this forum, as far as minimizing latency. How do you print your effect returns from the I/O plugin?
 
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bayswater

Logician
Maybe I'm missing the situation. You could bus the return channel to another audio track/channel and set that to record. Or just try recording the return channel directly. I don't see why that wouldn't work.
 
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