Logic Pro 9 Why am I getting this?

David51

Logician
I am using Logic 9.1.5 and an Akai EWI breath controller, both are tuned down to 415.3 in order to be a bit more relaxed. I am having to use headphones because of thin walls and when I play the solo WIVI part it sounds fine,but when I record enable that channel strip I get Left ear a semitone lower than the Right ear. The possibilities are so many that I can't see the trees because of the forest,sorry Dutch proverb not working in english. I am sure there must be an answer but I can't get around the possibilities, I mean I could transpose the track [have tried that some but no joy] and I can transpose the WIVI software instrument, but what I can't find is the right combination. I fear I have really painted myself into a corner. I would be incredibly thankful if some of you smart users would lower yourself to my level and help an old man out of this mud.
 

Pete Thomas

Administrator
Staff member
I am using Logic 9.1.5 and an Akai EWI breath controller, both are tuned down to 415.3 in order to be a bit more relaxed.
can you explain what you mean by this?

I get the feeling this is a question about the EWI or WIVI rather than Logic.
 
Q: was the track "tuned" down using the pitch plug-in in Logic?

If so, was the track in mono, before you recorded the audio, and then after this was the track changed to a stereo track rather than a mono one?

I suspect that you installed a pitch change plug-in (can't remember the exact name) in a mono track and didn't disable it, so it' is playing one side in correctly. this would be a bug but I think that might be the issue.

If so, change the track to mono, disable the pitch shifter plugin and then see if it's in tune on both sides. If it is, change the track to stereo, and then put the Stereo Pitch Shifter plug-in in the first insert and change the tuning from there to match your new tuning.

I hope that makes sense...
 

David51

Logician
I am using Logic 9.1.5 and an Akai EWI breath controller, both are tuned down to 415.3 in order to be a bit more relaxed.
can you explain what you mean by this?

I get the feeling this is a question about the EWI or WIVI rather than Logic.
The raising pitch over three centuries is well documented. The reason usually given is to sound more exciting[brilliant ] lowering the pitch brings some relief from thee pitch equivalent of the loudness wars. The question has to do with Logics' amazing amount of methods to do this, however, I know see that doing this through a forum is asking too much,mea culpa.
 

David51

Logician
Thank you George. You make perfect sense as always. I have realized this post was not what I should have done as it would be terribly time consuming, I will follow your inquiry as to wether this 'might' be a bug as that apparently is worth the trouble. i can clarify now that no pitch changing plugin was in use, only the Project tuning settings[ and they work]. Also the track Parameters transpose was briefly tried, I decided it must be the EWI MIDI controller that had gone bad but the EWI works on all the projects at 440.

What would help avoid my being such a nuisance is an explanation of the different paths the Audio from a software Instrument responding to a MIDI file uses when record is not enabled as opposed to the path when record enable is on.
 

Pete Thomas

Administrator
Staff member
The raising pitch over three centuries is well documented. The reason usually given is to sound more exciting[brilliant ]
I wasn't aware of that reason. I know that there have previously been many lower pitch standards, but there have also been some higher (452 and 457).

I didn't think it had anything to do with the sound being more exciting, as I don't think most people can hear any significant difference when used as a standard. I think some people may notice if, e.g. they heard a higher pitched tune immediately after a lower pitched one, but again, I'm sure most people wouldn't.

I know a few people with perfect pitch who can tell, but most of those think of i as a bit of a curse rather than anything good.

What can make a difference is when one section tunes very slightly higher than the main body of the band (e.g. 442), I've often heard this with brass sections.

I never mess with the A 440 standard, as I never know when I may want to add a real instrument. If I'd started at some other pitch this would be really awkward if I wanted to add a saxophone overdub.
 

David51

Logician
The raising pitch over three centuries is well documented. The reason usually given is to sound more exciting[brilliant ]
I wasn't aware of that reason. I know that there have previously been many lower pitch standards, but there have also been some higher (452 and 457)

Louis 14th's Versailles Opera played around 392, as you wrote there where higher pitches as well, many of Bachs' Cantatas have the organ and strings at 465 and the woodwinds at 392,these were new instruments at that time in Germany,brought by Protestant Musicians escaping the expulsion in France and bringing their "new" instrument with them, and it cost a lot of church money to buy the lead to lengthen the organ pipes to a lower pitch. In the 19th C. the french and English got together to try and create a standard pitch, they worked in vain, Von Karajan raised the berliners to 445 and Vienna had to follow to sound as sparkling. Most of the effect was PR, of course-The Maestro Myth.

I didn't think it had anything to do with the sound being more exciting, as I don't think most people can hear any significant difference when used as a standard. I think some people may notice if, e.g. they heard a higher pitched tune immediately after a lower pitched one, but again, I'm sure most people wouldn't.

Sadly I must agree completely with that, 50+ years of Muzak ruined the publics' ears. But 200 years ago composers had to gain favor with a nobleman to provide music at his estate or town house. The listening public were the minority that had a lot of money and had studied music them selves so they could hear the pure thirds we butcher today.

I know a few people with perfect pitch who can tell, but most of those think of i as a bit of a curse rather than anything good.

Sorry to pop anyones bubble but as you can imagine there is no such thing as "perfect pitch". I new a girl in High School who played Bassoon and claimed to have perfect pitch, when she wanted to join the old music ensemble at UTexas she found it impossible to adjust to the lower pitch. A real pity as she was a great musician and friend.

What can make a difference is when one section tunes very slightly higher than the main body of the band (e.g. 442), I've often heard this with brass sections.

One of my teachers was the solo Bassoonist in the Clevelend Orchestra and told me to play at the correct pitch ,very softly, and the brass would be corrected by Mazzel, the conductor.

I never mess with the A 440 standard, as I never know when I may want to add a real instrument. If I'd started at some other pitch this would be really awkward if I wanted to add a saxophone overdub.
I may follow your example since this experiment turned out so bad, I am sometimes reminded that I didn't die when expected, and am asked if my EWi could be used in concert with acoustic copies of Baroque Instruments, I was trying to see if that would be possible.
Thanks for letting me vent.
 
Top